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Foods NOT to Feed Your Rabbit

In addition to your rabbit’s regular hay, her diet can be supplemented with certain vegetables and fruits. Don’t just give her any old greens, though—here, your North West London veterinarian tells you about certain foods you should never give your rabbit.

Lettuce

Lettuce seems like something that a rabbit would enjoy, and they very well might eat it if it’s offered. However, lettuce contains a compound known as lactucarium, which can cause diarrhea in rabbits. Cases of rabbit fatalities have even been reported when a large amount of lettuce has been consumed, so it’s safest to avoid all types of lettuce entirely.

Weeds, Flowers, Plants

Do you let your rabbit roam out in the backyard when the weather warms up a bit? Make sure no dangerous weeds, flowers, or plants are growing in your grass or garden. Clover, ivy, iris, daffodils, honeysuckle, bluebells, foxglove, tulips, hemlock, buttercups—these are only a few of the potentially hazardous flowers and plants that could be found in the backyard. Check with your vet to see if dangerous weeds or plants commonly grow in your area, and restrict your rabbit’s access to them at all times.

Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli

Veterinarians recommend having your rabbit always avoid cabbage, cauliflower, and parsnips. The verdict is still out with regards to broccoli; some vets say this veggie is okay in small amounts, while others recommend avoiding it entirely. Ask your vet for more information on broccoli and whether or not it’s too risky for your rabbit to eat it.

Foods High in Carbs

High-carb foods like bread, nuts, cookies, corn, and beans don’t really have any great nutritional value to your rabbit. They’re really only adding fat, so it’s best to have your rabbit avoid them. Plus, a rabbit’s digestive system can’t take care of the hulls of corn kernels.

Your rabbit’s diet is of the utmost importance to her overall health. Since the matter can be a bit tricky, call your North West London veterinarian to get a professional’s opinion. Don’t leave your pet’s diet up to chance!

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